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A. Having been eliminated the public aid and what with/ on account of an increased rate of inflation as well, it seems that the earnings of the low-paid classes (of society) will /fall/diminish/.

First, as the bold parts tend to be associated with informal style, I am wondering what could be placed instead.

Meanwhile, have I eventually semantically and grammatically written the sentence "A"?

By the way, I strictly want to use the following now:

Having been p.p.

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No, it isn't entirely correct grammatically. Let's simplify for a minute, by putting the subordinate clause last:

It seems that the earnings of the low-paid classes will diminish, what with/on account of an increased rate of inflation and the public aid having been eliminated.

First, you have to say the public aid having been eliminated rather than having been eliminated the public aid. Consider this:

The public aid has been eliminated.
We have eliminated the public aid.

You'll note that the word order for passive voice is the reverse of that for active voice.

Next, on account of/what with refers to both the public aid and the inflation, so you need to reflect that by putting it before both ideas.

Now, you can put the subordinate clause first for emphasis, as you have:

What with/on account of the public aid having been eliminated and an increased rate of inflation, it seems that the earnings of the low-paid class will diminish.

Now, which to use, on account of or what with? I lean towards what with, because it has more of a flavor of speculation. When you say "it seems that" that also suggests speculation, so I find it a bit more in keeping with the overall speculative idea of the sentence. Either is entirely correct, though.

  • does "the public aid having been eliminated" mean that this "elimination" had already occurred? – nima Mar 13 '15 at 19:23
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    Yes it does. If you mean that it isn't eliminated yet but is going to be, then say "the public aid about to be eliminated" or something like "the upcoming elimination of public aid". – BobRodes Mar 13 '15 at 19:29

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