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Here's a situation.

There's certainly a time when one(A)of the two people(A,B) has come to like the other(B) more than (B) does.

How can I choose the word meaning what I'd like to mean here.

  1. There's certainly a time when one of the two people has come to like the other more than the person does.

  2. There's certainly a time when one of the two people has come to like the other more than the other does.

Which one is right?

  • "... to like the other (B) more than (B) does" Has B come to feel self-loathing? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Mar 17 '15 at 12:55
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The best way may be:

There's certainly a time when one of the two people has come to like the other more than the second person likes the first.

But I don't know of a true way to do this gracefully in English. It helps to have names:

There's certainly a time when Alan has come to like Beth more than Beth likes Alan.

If the two people command different pronouns, it can be said as:

There's certainly a time when she has come to like him more than he likes her.

But if they use the same pronoun, you wind up having to say:

There's certainly a time when he, Alan, has come to like him, Bob, more than Bob likes Alan.

Or else you could change the wording:

There's certainly a time when one of them has come to like the other more than is reciprocated.

"Requited" may be used instead of "reciprocated" if you want to to imply a romantic type of love or liking.

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The 'functional' (for want of a better term) part of your sentence has a predicate (like) that takes two arguments (one of the two people and the other), whereas the closing part only explicitly provides one (either the person or the other).

This leaves hanging who the second - unmentioned - person should be. The context suggests that if B is mentioned, the unmentioned person should be A (A likes B more than B likes A). But the sentence would also make sense if the unmentioned person was also B - though the message conveyed would be different (A likes B more than B likes B).

For clarity, consider including both parties both times:

  • there's certainly a time when one of the two people has come to like the other more than the other likes the first.

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