1

She doesn’t like it when you are so quiet.

Could you use "the fact that" instead of "it" that is used as an empty or dummy subject or object in the bold part?

1

No. We can say something like

She doesn't like the fact that you're so quiet.

But the meaning changes because "when" is removed.

We often use the fact [that] when we are contrasting something.

Despite the fact that she is 85 years old, she still chops her own firewood.

Another alternative could be something like

She doesn't like that you are sometimes so quiet.

0

1) She doesn't like it when you are so quiet.

2) She doesn't like the fact that when you are so quiet.

The first sentence is grammatically correct while the second sentence is not. "when you are so quite" is a subordinate clause (sc) and in order for the sentence to convey a full meaning, there should be a main clause (mc). For example, she doesn't like the fact that when you are so quiet you look horrible.

However, if you omit the "when" in your sentence, it'll be OK. You can say "She doesn't like the fact that you are so quiet. But this sentence doesn't give the same meaning as the sentence #1 that means that she doesn't like you at the time that you are so quiet. On the other hand, the sentence "She doesn't like the fact you are so quiet" conveys the sense that she doesn't like the fact that you are so quiet, maybe by habit.

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