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I read a sentence

"First you'll need the truck to get it to here from wherever you got it".

Is it still right if I delete the "to" before "here"?

Can anyone tell me the difference between "get to here" and "get here"? Are they all right in grammar?

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It's a sentence-construction style I think. Both mean same though. The person who found the truck should take it at some particular place (here).

Examples I found:

They highlight New England’s changing and complex energy environment caused by a glut of American natural gas and a shortage of ways to get it to here... - The Telegraph

And...

"It took them two hours to off-load it from the plane to get it to here," said Evans." -The Denver Channel

[The latter one is the statement though].

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Normally:

First you'll need the truck to get it to here from wherever you got it.

is fine, point A to point B. But if you say:

I need it right now, so get it here as fast as you can.

Using get it here is more like a command due to a sense of urgency.

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