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Scenario

A clerk reviews one's case regarding a temporary treatment or reimbursement (say welfare or treatment). Then, they make a decision to extend said period (by three to six months). After that, a new review is scheduled. This process can continue for years, sometimes even the rest of one's (working) life. Officially, the aim is to get a subject up and running but that's usually not the case, regrettably.

In order to provide statistics over such extensions, we have introduced a term period. However, "her period will last forever" or "when will the period end" sounds, well... you get the point.

So we called them decision periods.

Is there a better way to refer to such entities? It's supposed to sound dry, bureaucratic and official.

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    I don't think English is likely to have a specific term for separate consecutive extension [periods/decisions], as appears to be requested here. We'd more likely just "collapse" them all into a single "contiguous" period (Her [temporary/interim/etc] status will last forever), or focus on the periodic interim decisions as separate "events" (Her reviews will go on forever). Mar 24, 2015 at 18:41
  • @FumbleFingers I have but one remark: what you wrote feels to me more as a possible answer (especially given the examples) than a comment. Mar 25, 2015 at 2:07

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Answered in comments:

I don't think English is likely to have a specific term for separate consecutive extension [periods/decisions], as appears to be requested here. We'd more likely just "collapse" them all into a single "contiguous" period (Her [temporary/interim/etc] status will last forever), or focus on the periodic interim decisions as separate "events" (Her reviews will go on forever). – FumbleFingers Mar 24 2015

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