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I am writing this sentence:

If you have anyone here, I can give it to him/her, and he/she will transfer them to you.

Have I used them correctly in that sentence, or have I should have said it?

Thanks.

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Money is a "mass" noun, much like snow, water, or sand. These are nouns which do not represent items that are generally conceived as coming in individual pieces but rather exist in "piles" of various sizes. I assume this is what you mean by suggesting that money may be considered plural, and indeed that is the case. One cannot say "a money" and "lots of moneys" in grammatical English, but rather must use simply "money", just as there is no such thing as "a water" or "a sand" in the common sense (of course we have "a drop of water" or "a grain of sand" but then we are no longer using water or sand as the main noun).

So yes, it should instead be:

If you have anyone here, I can give it to him/her, and he/she will transfer it to you.

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  • So we would say (in the US) a dollar (which could exist only as data in e.g. a bank account), or a dollar bill (the physical piece of paper). – jamesqf Mar 28 '15 at 22:02

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