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Hot summer is coming and I need some money for new skirts. So, I applied for a part-time babysitting job to earn the money last month.

They scheduled me for an interview for yesterday evening. While I was waiting for my turn to be interviewed, I spoke very softly with other interviewees sitting next to me. I was very shocked on hearing their academic backgrounds.

The job requirement for a babysitter required applicants to have completed their high schools, that's it. But the interviewees told me that they are master's and doctorate graduates. And I was like "oh my..."

I would like to ask if there are any words to describe people whose academic or technical backgrounds are far more than enough or than required by their prospective employers? Is it over-killed? Or over-quality?

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    Overqualified, perhaps? – Lucian Sava Mar 31 '15 at 21:02
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    The first phrase that comes to mind is over-qualified, but for something like babysitting where there are more qualifications required than just a level of education, it might not be the most precise word. I'll have to think about it some more. – ColleenV parted ways Mar 31 '15 at 21:03
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    I don't think it is overkilled.lol – David Washington Mar 31 '15 at 21:05
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    @DavidWashington I wouldn't say, "overkilled", persay, but I can picture someone saying, "Their qualifications are a little overkill for this job." – Keiki Mar 31 '15 at 21:08
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    Conversely, if they took the babysitting job, one might say they are underemployed. (AmE) – Adam Mar 31 '15 at 21:53
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The word overqualified may suit your needs. It means too highly qualified for a particular job (Google).

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    -1 Where does Google say this? This definition is a poor one. One usually doesn't define a word using a component of that word – user6951 Apr 1 '15 at 12:31
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    Google will return a definition at the top of the page, but for ELL, I think it is better to use a dedicated dictionary. The dictionaries have more detailed definitions and related information that is useful to learners, while the definitions returned by Google are more for folks that know English and are looking up an unfamiliar word. @δοῦλος – ColleenV parted ways Apr 1 '15 at 13:11
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    @ColleenV exactly why I'm asking, since Google has having qualifications that exceed the requirements of a particular job for me (USA, no proxy) – user6951 Apr 1 '15 at 14:38
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overqualified

According to the Cambridge Dictionary:

"having more knowledge, skill, and/or experience than is needed (for a particular job)"

The problem with employing people who are overqualified for the job is that they often don't stay in it for long.

Link

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