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Example with a context:

I'll type cd ..\bin, I'll list the contents of the directory, and I'll see the new copy of Main.class. Now, because I've changed my current directory to bin, I can run the class from here, with java Main. Let's switch back to the source folder, cd ..\src. And I'm going to show you one incredibly valuable thing that running from the command line will let you do. I'll once again clear my screen.

What's the subject of that clause? Running from the command line? My understanding is the activity of running from the command line will let you do one incredibly valuable thing. But how would you classify this type of subject? Gerund?

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    I think there's also an ellipsis to throw you a curve ball… 'running [a command] from the command line' – Tetsujin Apr 2 '15 at 8:30
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You are correct, this is a gerund. From Wikipedia:

A gerund behaves as a verb within a clause (so that it may be modified by an adverb or have an object); but the resulting clause as a whole (sometimes consisting of only one word, the gerund itself) functions as a noun within the larger sentence.

For example, consider the sentence "Eating this cake is easy." Here the gerund is the verb eating, which takes an object this cake. The entire clause eating this cake is then used as a noun, which in this case serves as the subject of the larger sentence.

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