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Sometimes, a person can speak on and on that he ultimately forgets what he was talking about, this is known as "to lose the thread," and thus he do not know how to connect those points he made there with the vital argument, but he do not feel to delete what he had just said as it sounded really good, so when he is writing the new paragraph, he don't know quite how to connect the two paragraphs and arguments, and he also know he cannot leave it there as it is as that seems too flat and "unethical. (misnomer)"

So, is there are literary style in a poetic way of connecting the two paragraphs and still not? So one may get the impression the point is still going on, but also gradually evolving to its own self.

I cannot show you the essay, but here is an analog to it:

"An ongoing theme in the Bible is human mistakes. The authors of the Bible assumes the role of God and speaks to the readers in various literary styles, the genre of the Bible is diverse; the Bible does not speak to the infidels in a bad manner, instead, it is like an uncle; you don't see him much and the love is not strong, but it is sufficient for an uncle and nephew, this is the likeness of a son with no contact to his father and then finally meeting again after... blablabla [................. ................................ ........................... ...................................... ................................. ...... . ............ ................ ........... .......... ........ ................ ............ .......... ............ ............................ ............. . . . ....... ..................... ....................... ........ ....... . ....This vast space of analogies, parables, metaphors and allegories in a verbose style, just for the "it is like an uncle" part... that I seem to be unable to return back on topic without satisfactorily farewelling the allegories and go on topic by how the Bible is not hostile to infidels.]

(Hmmm... where was I?)"

Is there a way to go back on topic, but also concluding the allegories in an epilogue-sense of way?

Thanks in advance.

closed as off-topic by FumbleFingers, ColleenV, M.A.R., Damkerng T., snailboat Apr 3 '15 at 22:53

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If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

  • The word you are looking for (a word that means "to smoothly transition between two unrelated ideas") is "segue", but I don't have any universal advice about creating segues. – Keiki Apr 3 '15 at 19:55
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    I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is a request for writing advice (specifically, how to segue between disparate themes which probably shouldn't appear consecutively in the first place). – FumbleFingers Apr 3 '15 at 20:55
  • At this point your argument is hopeless confused and it might be better to poke fun at it a bit. Just say, "And from that it should be clear that ..." and immediately go back to your point. – Jim Apr 3 '15 at 23:27
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You state that it is an essay and not spoken word, that gives you some option with introducing the tangent or side track, using something like:

  • to illustrate this let us compare this to an uncle ...
  • an image to illustrate this aspect is ...

And then later on continue with something like:

  • Back on the track of the Bible and infidels you could ...
  • Another point regarding how the Bible addresses infidels are ...

You could possibly also in addition to introducing the illustration or deviation, make it stand out visually like a block quote or little side story, and then simply end the visual difference to get back on track.

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Short answer: No.

This is usually called a tangent, and is generally a bad practice. Unless your metaphor applies broadly to the topic of the overall argument, either keep it very short (one sentence, maybe two) or cut it out. You can only properly resolve the tangent by applying it broadly to the entire topic - if you can do this it can make the argument sound very strong, if not the readers will feel like you are wasting their time.

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