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I cut this phrase out of a TV series and uploaded to Youtube: https://youtu.be/vfj-fl1wq74

The phrase "I need your help" phonetically looks like [aɪ nidʒyər hɛlp]. I listened to the video over and over again and I hear some stress on "help", but I don't hear any stress on "need" and "your". I know we can stress different words to change the meaning for example:

I need your help - I need your help. I need help, not my brother, not my sister, and not my neighbor.

I need YOUR help - I need YOUR help. I need your help, not your neighbor's help.

However, I'm interested in the context above (the attached video). In the attached video I can't hear any stress other than the word "help", and I think it is the most common way we use the phrase. I would like to have your feedback. I'm not a native speaker and can't distinguish very well.

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Stressing help is fine and logical here:

The male speaker asks

"What are you doing? I need your help - Preston can't find his shoe."

He sais what he needs (-> help, hence slightly stressed), not who needs help or where he intends to get it from, which would put the stress on "I" or "your".

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The intonation is impatient and exasperated; intoned in that way, it means "Don't just sit there. I'd like you to get up off your ass and help me to find the shoe."

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Your question couldn't help but remind me of the old southern song, "Not my brother, not my sister, but it's me, Oh Lord ..." https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dTwlIYmDcws :-)

Anyway, you could put emphasis on any word in this sentence and get a slight change in meaning.

"I need your help". What I need is help, not judgment. Or, not sympathy. Or whatever the person may be offering that isn't what you need.

"I need your help." No one else can help me. I need help from you.

"I need your help." There is no way I will manage without your help.

"I need your help." Not somebody else, not my brother nor my sister nor the neighbor, but me.

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