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I am reading this sentence:

Ms. Clinton is expected to visit the early voting states of Iowa and New Hampshire shortly with a message of economic equality. She says, “So I’m hitting the road to earn your vote. Because it’s your time. And I hope you’ll join me in this journey.

what does shortly mean in that sentence please?

Does it mean that the visit of Ms. Clinton to those two states are shortly? or her message for them is a short message? or what?

Thanks

closed as off-topic by Jim Reynolds, Dmitrii Bundin, jimsug, Adam Haun, user6951 Apr 20 '15 at 14:52

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    It means in the near future, soon. She is expected to visit soon. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 13 '15 at 12:52
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    I think shortly = in a short time; soon is General Reference. It's not likely the alternative sense in an abrupt manner could apply to the given context. – FumbleFingers Apr 13 '15 at 15:41
  • It means (the visit will be) soon, in the near future, as already pointed out. The duration of the visit is not considered though as the campaign is a political one it is likely to be brief. – Ian Lewis Apr 13 '15 at 16:05
  • Vote to close as this word can be looked up in a dictionary, in the form shortly. If you have trouble understanding the meaning of the word after consulting a dictionary, please explain your question in more detail if possible. – Jim Reynolds Apr 13 '15 at 19:02
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It means she will visit them soon.

She will visit them in a short amount of time.

She will visit them shortly.

The length of her visit may be short or long. The length of her speech may be short or long. We don't know. All we know is that her visit will be soon.

It's kind of a strange word. You can NOT say, "she will visit them longly," to mean she will visit them in the future, but not soon. ("Longly" isn't a word). In this case, the opposite of "shortly" would probably be "later".

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