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"Regardless of sunny weather, they went for playing football."
"Regardless of social networking, many people getting famous personality"

Could you tell whether above two sentences are correct?

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    "many people getting famous personality" is ungrammatical. If these people are getting famous then they are becoming famous personalities (i.e., celebrities). They are not getting their personality; they already have it. Or perhaps you meant they are "getting famous personally?" – Brian Hitchcock Apr 14 '15 at 5:37
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Regardless of should indicate that what follows is surprising in some way, or that what preceded didn't matter. A good synonym would be despite.

For example, I might say:

Regardless of the rainy weather, they went to play football.

That's another way of saying:

Even though it was raining, they went to play football.

Your initial example talked about sunny whether:

Regardless of sunny weather, they went for playing football.

Sunny weather sounds ideal for playing football! So regardless doesn't sound quite right there.

As for the order, you could also say the sentence like this:

They played football, regardless of the bad weather.

Both forms are used.

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They are quite okay. The word 'regardless' can be used that way. And, a sentence can begin with this word.

Other examples from YourDictionary:

Regardless of whether he 's the six billionth baby or not, I 'm a happy mother.
Regardless of the artist, all the subjects seem to end up looking stern.
Regardless of what they think of his politics, most Jewish activists likely would welcome Soros ' participation in the world of Jewish philanthropy.

And there are many more.

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  • Orderwise, they are okay, but I still think the O.P. is missing something. I wouldn't play football regardless of the sunny weather – though I might play football because of the sunny weather. – J.R. Apr 14 '15 at 9:16

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