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A - It appears that your son is taking my granddaughter to the ball tonight.

B - He is?

A - I'd rather see that not happen. There's no point in being presented if it's improperly, And your Daniel is not a proper companion for a girl like Serena. He's a, um, temporary distraction. I need her to focus on her future.

B - Hers or yours?

A - I am willing to purchase all the paintings in this gallery in exchange for you convincing your son not to accompany Serena. Before you answer, remember... A grown man with children is in a very different position than a young man. The money could be useful now. Not to mention, how much this sale would mean to your wife's career as an artist.

B - Your money was no good for me then... And it's still no good with me now And you can rest assured that like me, my son can't be bought.

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It's one clip of the drama "Gossip girl season 1 episode 10". I want to know the difference between "no good for" and "no good with" in the last line.

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It needs little more descriptions. B was on intimate terms with A's daughter. The news bowled A over. A visited B and told B to split up with her daughter, giving a lot of money. But B didn't take the proposal. Eventually B and A's daughter parted. And the same situation happens except for two characters' change: B's daughter for B's granddaughter and A for A's son as the script says.

Please help me! Thanks!!

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Probably easiest if you consider the prepositions to be part of a verb phrase. There's many instances in English where prepositions associated with a verb don't really do much but change the verb's meaning.

To be good for means able to truly/really benefit, if the subject is not a person (Note that if the subject is a person, it can then mean to be committed to - but not always)

To be good with X means to be approved by X, the negative to not be good with meaning to be disapproved by X.

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  • Then, "your money was no good for me" means "You money didn't benefit for me/You money didn't be useful for me"? And It means "I took the money from you and it's useless and valueless"? Commented Apr 14, 2015 at 13:28
  • @anotherworld - I think we need more context to answer that. From the brief clip we're given, it sounds like these characters have a past conflict that is referenced here. However, we don't know the details of that conflict - either B took the money in the past but later regretted it, or did not take the money because they recognized it as a bad move at that time. Commented Apr 14, 2015 at 14:40
  • By contrast, as ultrasawblade mentions, in the present conflict, B is expressing disapproval of A's attempt to buy his/her way out of the conflict. Commented Apr 14, 2015 at 14:43
  • B didn't take the money of A's and also now B doesn't want to take the money of A's. Commented Apr 15, 2015 at 3:47

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