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What is the right way of the following two?

  1. Vein IS made of three layers.

  2. Vein made of three layers.

closed as off-topic by user3169, Catija, Ben Kovitz, pyobum, ColleenV Apr 16 '15 at 11:59

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  • Do you intend your examples to be complete sentences? Or are they phrases that would go inside a larger sentence? – Ben Kovitz Apr 16 '15 at 4:43
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    Please allow at least a day or two before accepting an answer, even if you get a good one right away. For info about why this is helpful, please see “Not so fast! (When should I accept my answer?)”. – Ben Kovitz Apr 16 '15 at 5:10
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Neither is correct as a complete sentence. You could say

  1. Veins are made of three layers.

  2. The vein is made of three layers.

  3. A vein is made of three layers.

All three of these would be understood the same way. In 2 and 3, the singular is used but it is understood that the statement applies to all veins.

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