3

I was a little confused by the meaning of the adverb in here:

And yet he hesitated before taking his first step toward his destiny.

I expected still instead of yet in that sentence. Does it have the same meaning here?

2

Still and yet have several meanings, but both can be used in your example to convey the same thought. Consider LDOCE definition for yet as a conjunction:

used to introduce a fact, situation, or quality that is surprising after what you have just said

and LDOCE definition 2 for still:

in spite of what has just been said or done

So I would understand the given example like this: based on something you previously told us about him we would expect him to take his first step toward his destiny without hesitation, but to our surprise, he hesitated (for some reason).

  • 1
    These are similar thoughts, but I wouldn't call them "the same." There's a slight difference, and I don't think they're quite interchangeable. – J.R. Apr 19 '15 at 19:51
  • {Be that as it may/yet/still}, I doubt that many readers these days would catch the subtle distinction. Alas, entropy. – Brian Hitchcock Apr 20 '15 at 6:29
  • @Brian HItchcook Too subtle for me, I'm afraid. I've tried but I can't grasp it. Can you please help? – Lucky Apr 21 '15 at 7:18
  • I was just responding to J.R. , trying to imply (with my curly braces) that I think "yet" and "still" are, for all practical purposes, in most cases, interchangeable. – Brian Hitchcock Apr 22 '15 at 7:11
1

And yet he hesitated before taking his first step toward his destiny.

Here, and yet means nevertheless.

Edit:

Sorry, I just noticed your question, "expected still instead of yet in that sentence. Does it have the same meaning here?"

Not exactly. "Still" suggests a bit of a contradiction with what came before.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.