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Please rephrase the last sentence from the quote of John F. Kennedy

Too often we hold fast to the cliches of our forebears. We subject all facts to a prefabricated set of interpretations. We enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought.

I don't quite understand what John F. Kennedy meant by "the comfort of opinion" and "the discomfort of thought".

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Kennedy is warning his audience of the dangers of accepting someone else's opinions simply because it is easier than thinking for themselves and coming up with their own opinions.

The 'comfort of opinion' is the sense of satisfaction one gets from having an opinion on a subject - when we have an opinion, we feel secure in our understanding of the subject. We know what's going on, and we know how we feel about it, and there's no need to worry about it. The 'discomfort of thought' is the difficulty and effort involved in thinking for yourself, questioning your worldview, and reaching an informed opinion.

An alternate phrasing could be "It is easy and pleasant to accept another's opinion without thought.", with the implication that, despite being easy, it is wrong or dangerous to do so. "Think for yourself" and "Question your assumptions" are frequently used phrases that have a similar meaning. All of these are very common exhortations in graduation speeches.

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More context:

As every past generation has had to disenthrall itself from an inheritance of truisms and stereotypes, so in our own time we must move on from the reassuring repetition of stale phrases to a new, difficult, but essential confrontation with reality. For the great enemy of the truth is very often not the lie—deliberate, contrived, and dishonest—but the myth—persistent, persuasive, and unrealistic. Too often we hold fast to the cliches of our forebears. We subject all facts to a prefabricated set of interpretations. We enjoy the comfort of opinion without the discomfort of thought. Mythology distracts us everywhere—in government as in business, in politics as in economics, in foreign affairs as in domestic affairs.

Kennedy is saying that believing things is comfortable, but challenging those beliefs is not. As people grow up, they acquire a distorted view of the world based on ideas they take for granted. These ideas give a feeling of security -- it feels safe to "know" what's going on. But eventually you have to let go of that security and certainty to learn more about the real world.

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