1

Let's say I am in a house with two entrances, one in the back, one in front. I need to ask someone which one they took Should I say

I did not see you come in. Did you come in front/back?

or

I did not see you come in. Did you come from front/back?

Are they both idiomatic? If yes, Which of these two expression a native speaker is more likely to use?

  • To me it is idiomatic (AmE). – user3169 Apr 24 '15 at 4:43
  • 2
    It's generally the front and the back: I didn't see you come in. Did you come in the front? You can expand this with additional words if you like: "Did you come in through the back/front [door]?" With back you can also use way: Did you come in the back way? (Using way with front isn't as common- since the front is not an alternate or sneaky way in it's just called "the front door". – Jim Apr 24 '15 at 5:12
2

It is a bit different between where you came into the house, and where you came from.

I did not see you come in. Did you come in the front/back door?

and

I did not see you come in. Did you come in from the front porch/backyard?

-2

You are talking about the source which is unknown to you.

When you talk about the source, it is generally with the preposition 'from'.

I did not notice you. Did you come from the backdoor?

People come from somewhere as a source which is the case here.

You come from America
She came from the top
He came from the washroom. And so on...

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