4

1) Am I right to divide these senteces into clauses like this?

2) What about their types(subject, predicative, object)?

  1. It’s odd (main clause) / how it hurts/ at these times/ not to be part of your proper family (predicative).
  2. It was only then (main clause) / that I realized (predicative) / that she was travelling too (subject).
  3. What I want to know (predicative) / is / when you’re going to get married (subject)

In the 1st one we can change the order like: Not to be part of your proper family hurts and it is odd - so that must be a subject, right?

What about the 2nd, some would call "that I realized" - a relative clause, but I don't know what it is. It's not even in my lecture material. Is it the same as an appositive (content) clause?

This source may give you an idea of what clauses are according to Russian grammarians: (http://bookre.org/reader?file=627767&pg=303)

Just help me to define types of clauses, according to the source I gave.

2
+25

It’s odd (main clause) how it hurts at these times not to be part of your proper family (2.main clause).

it-subject (pronominal it); is odd..family-predicate; not to be part of your proper family is a subject of this subordinate clause. >

It was only then (main clause) / that I realized that she was travelling too.(subordinate clause, predicative)

You can say Only then (adverbial modifier of time) I realized that she was travelling too(relative clause functioning as object). it is a subject called preparatory it) >

What I want to know is (1.main clause, predicative) / when you’re going to get married (2.main clause, object)

I- is a subject, because you can say

When you are going to get married is what I want to know.

This sentence when you're...married refers to what and it is subordinate sentence functioning as direct object.

0

I'd parse the first sentence

It’s odd, how it hurts at these times not to be part of your proper family.

like this:

{How it hurts at these times not to be part of your proper family} is the subject phrase, apposite {It}, a dummy subject. What is being predicated of that subject? {(it) is odd}

Let's do some recursion and drill down into the subject phrase:

A negated infinitive clause {not to be part of your proper family} is the subject of the verb {hurts}; the subject is again apposite another dummy subject {it}; the verb has adverbial modifiers {how} and {at these times}.

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