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I'm reading an article in which the author writes about his experience of walking a pilgrimage route. And it goes:

"Everybody got lost now and then. I don’t know that it’s an inevitable part of any pilgrimage, although I can see where it might be. I do know it was part of ours."

Does "I don’t know that it’s an inevitable part of any pilgrimage" mean that "I don't know if every pilgrim gets lost on the way"? If so, what does he mean by "although I can see where it might be"? I'm at a complete loss of understanding this sentence.

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    I'd say yes on the first one (it does mean: I'm not sure if it is an inevitable part... (or not)). As for the second, from context I'd say "where" means "that" - "...although I see that it might be" or something along the lines of: "...although I see that such situations in which it might be so, might exist" – Lucky Apr 27 '15 at 14:50
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The first clause does mean "I don't know if every pilgrim gets lost on the way". The second clause you're asking about means "although I can understand some ways in which this might be the case". "See where", "see how", and "see why" are largely interchangeable in this usage.

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