-1

Here's an original sentence.

  1. When you're in emotional pain, treat yourself with the same compassion you would expect from a truly good friend.

And here are sentences that I've made to compare and hence understand fully.

  1. When you're in emotional pain, treat yourself with the same compassion as the one you would expect from a truly good friend.

I'm a English learner and I'm not sure why, but I always expect an "as" after "the same + noun". So, for me, sentence #2 is much more comfortable to read and speak.

Are #1 and #2 interchangeable or do they mean different things?

2

You've got the right idea. They would mean the same thing, except that #2 is incorrect. Although I can see what you were thinking, and you are very close.

You are correct that usually we have "as" after "the same + noun". However, you can leave off "as" and it will be implied.

"This is the same guitar [as] Eddie van Halen used!"

Another thing that is left out of this sentence but still implied is "The guitar that". So the FULL sentence is

"This is the same guitar as the guitar that Eddie van Halen used!"

However, it is still valid if you leave out "The guitar that".

Let's take "treat yourself with the same compassion".

"treat yourself with the same compassion" -- "as What?" The answer is "[The compassion] you would expect from a truly good friend."

The only problem with your sentence, is that you refer to "The compassion you would except from a truly good friend." as "the ONE you would expect..." You cannot count compassion. So you should not refer to it as "one".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.