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Example: After she completes the form, ___ will be processed by Jason.

Answers:

  1. that
  2. it

If I don't use comma after the word 'form', I can use 'that'. But if I use comma, can I use 'that' instead of 'it'?

One reference said that it will be wrong if I use 'that' instead of 'it' when comma is used. I don't understand why it will be wrong?

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You're confusing what the reference meant. If you use "that" with no comma, it will have approximately the same meaning as "which." This is correct, but will no longer be a complete sentence because you took the event of the sentence and turned it into a description of a noun. Here is that structure, but with more added to make it a complete sentence:

"After she completes the form which/that will be processed by Jason, it will be finalized."

"Processed by Jason" is no longer an event because it has become a description. Adding a new event makes the sentence complete. The form will be finalized.

If you keep your original sentence as is but use "it" and the comma, it will be correct.

"After she completes the form, it will be processed by Jason."

Here, the form is the subject of the sentence, and we say what is happening to it. It will be processed by Jason.

I hope that helped. I can try to clarify more if necessary.

  • "After she completes the form which/that will be processed by Jason" is incomplete. If I don't use the word "After", will this sentence be considered as complete sentence? – Nazmul Hassan Apr 29 '15 at 12:06
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    It will be a complete sentence, but the meaning will have shifted. "She completes the form that will be processed by Jason" is in present tense, while it looks like you want to use future tense based on your original sentence. – Whelt Apr 29 '15 at 14:01
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"After she completes the form, ___ will be processed by Jason."

In this sentence, "it" is the correct option. "After she completes the form," is an adverbial of time. Using "that" instead of "it" and no comma results in the defining relative clause "(the form) that will be processed by Jason". Both the adverbial of time at the beginning as well as the whole sentence would not make sense anymore as a lack of information would occur: "After she completes the form that will be processed by Jason, ... (then what?) ..."

Using the pronoun "it" is like saying: "After she completes the form, the form will be processed by Jason." which makes perfect sense, thus, is the word to use.

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