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We read through the documents on construction of an office building near the village N.

Help me please to sort out difficulties with the sentence above. Does the sentence have an ambiguous meaning? We did not read the documents near the village N. The office building must be constructed near the village.

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The sentence can be ambiguous, yes. It could either mean reading documents about an office building near the village, or it could mean reading documents near the village.

To help clarify this, you could say either of the following. If you're reading documents about an office building near the village:

We read through the documents on construction of an office building located near the village N.

Or if you're reading the documents near the village:

We were near the village N when we read through the documents on construction of an office building.

  • Thank you. Does the first wording change slightly the original meaning? Can the construction (as a process) be located? – user18856 May 4 '15 at 20:07
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    Are you reading documents while sitting at a construction site? Or are you reading documents about construction? (I thought the second, so that could change my answer) – Nicole May 4 '15 at 20:11
  • I mean, the works must be carried out near the village. I am happy with your answer as it is. I just want to know whether we can emphasize that the process itself (not a building) is being carried out near the village? – user18856 May 4 '15 at 20:22
  • Oh! Okay, that makes sense. Yes, construction as a process can have a location, and the first sentence will handle that. – Nicole May 4 '15 at 20:24

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