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I'm not much of a writer , but I like to... ?

What would be the best suited and appropriate word here for immature writers who like to write a diary? Or who are passionate for improving their writing skills? It would probably be a word related to 'trying', something that would imply both that I am not fully skilled yet and I that I want to improve (and possibly learn by doing.)

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    ... write? .... – Stephie May 4 '15 at 20:07
  • Yeah, this sounds like a homework question. We don't do people's homework. – Zessa May 4 '15 at 20:07
  • @ Stephie no, a better word than this. As in writers are usually expert in writing. But the people immature who are not eloquent yet try hard to do so – Ardis Ell May 4 '15 at 20:10
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    dab·ble ˈdabəl/Submit verb 1. immerse (one's hands or feet) partially in water and move them around gently. "they dabbled their feet in the rock pools" synonyms: splash, dip, paddle, trail; immerse "they dabbled their feet in rock pools" (of a duck or other waterbird) move the bill around in shallow water while feeding. "teal dabble in the shallows" 2. take part in an activity in a casual or superficial way. "he dabbled in writing as a young man" synonyms: toy with, dip into, flirt with, tinker with, trifle with, play with, dally with "he dabbled in politics" – Zessa May 4 '15 at 20:14
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    Why can't you like to do something you are not (yet) good at? You needn't be a writer (which says nothing about the quality of his work, btw.) to write. – Stephie May 4 '15 at 20:16
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You are still in the early stages of learning to write and you know there is plenty of room to grow and become better, but you still love to write. Your heading asked a general question, presumably covering a wide range of activities, not just writing.

Everyone is in that situation with respect to some aspect of their life - they are called amateurs.

I love to play tennis and hope to get better - I'm an amateur. My wife loves to cook and continually gets better - she is an amateur.

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    I think this is a good answer, but want to give the OP a heads up. To refer to oneself as an amateur usually means that one does something for the pleasure of it, as a devotee, and that one is far from mastery and needs to improve. But to call someone else an amateur often has a pejorative sense, that is, they're not trying to become competent, rather they're hopelessly incompetent. – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 5 '15 at 14:32
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"Journal" is another word you could use. From Dictionary.com:

verb (used without object), journalized, journalizing: to keep or make entries in a journal.

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Make an attempt, or just attempt. This implies that you are not a master of the activity.

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