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I say

Having been given something, I am ready to do something.

to express that now I am ready to do something because I was given something else. However, I want to say that if in the future I am successful at obtaining something I will be ready to do something else. Is this a correct construction?

Would/Will have been given something, I will be ready to do something.

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  • Though there is no true future participle, there are some pseudo future participles, all used differently and none truly fitting your meaning. Examples: Before going home, I went to the store. About to reach my stop, I relinquished my seat to someone else. – Anonym Apr 25 '15 at 19:32
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    Maybe "Were I to be given X, I would be ready to do Y"? – augurar Apr 25 '15 at 20:26
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If you want to say that, if at some future time you are given X, than when that happens you will do Y, you could say:

If I am given X, I will do Y.

or

When I am given X, I will do Y.

If you want to say that you will accept a promise or some other assurance now, but you don't necessary need immediate "delivery", you could say:

If I will be given X, I will do Y.

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You are saying "If I am given X, then I'll be ready to do Y." This is a conditional expression and you should follow the rules for that.

Note that your X can't be in past tense and your Y in future tense. If X has already occurred, then there is no uncertainty and the whole thing needs to be in the past tense to make sense.

If I had been given X, I would have been ready to do Y. (Expressing an uncertainty in the past which does not exist anymore by virtue of being able to say what happened. If the uncertainty exists in the present, X and Y must be present tense.)

If I am given X, I will be ready to do Y. (Expressing a present uncertainty and something that could/would/may happen upon a condition)

In present tense, Y can sometimes use the word would, i.e.

If I am given X, I would be ready to do Y.

is still all present tense. But will is never used to express anything in the past.

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I want to say that, if, in the future, I am successful at obtaining something, I will be ready to do something else. (Commas mine for clarity)

You would use one of many Conditional Clauses.

Should can be used in a Conditional Clause to express a possibility:

  • Should I be given X, I would be ready to do Y.

[If + Were] Conditional Clause can be used to discuss what might happen but seem unlikely:

  • If I were given X, I would be ready to do Y.

[Providing + That] in a Conditional Clause imposing specific conditions:

  • Provided that I receive X, I can do Y.

Supposing in a Conditional Clause is used to imagine a situation:

  • Supposing I had X, I could do Y.

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