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May I know which of the following two sentences is grammatical?

  1. From what I’ve described which aspects would you say were the “must haves”?

  2. From what I’ve described which aspects would you say are the “must haves”?

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    Is it past tense or present tense? Are the "Must haves" still the "must haves" or were they the "must haves" in 1960 but aren't any more? – Catija May 15 '15 at 3:39
  • Both versions are grammatical. As to which one might be more preferable, it would probably depend on the context and on the speaker. Version #2 might be restricted to a present time of "must have" (or maybe not). It seems that version #1 can be used wherever version #2 can be used; also version #1 can be used for a past time of "must have" (if there is such a thing). – F.E. May 15 '15 at 4:54
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Both are grammatically correct. If you think some things were essential or indispensable in the past and no longer so in the present, you should use "were must-haves". If you think that they are so in the present, you should use "are must-haves".

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