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Imagine one of your close friend was going to take an important exam and you would like that exam happen in a way your friend gets happy, what would you tell him?

  1. I wish, you would pass the exam well

  2. I wish you a good exam

  3. I hope that you will pass the exam well

  4. Hope you pass the exam well

Which one is better?

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There's a good chance I would say this in one of two ways:

1) I hope you pass the exam.

or:

2) I hope you do well on the exam.

Either someone passes the exam, or they don't, so we don't usually say, "I hope you pass it well."

However, in the context of test-taking, the verb do talks about how well someone does, so we can say, "I hope you do well on the exam."

When speaking, you could leave off the word "I" in front; it's considered implied and therefore you don't always need to say it:

Hope you ace your exam!

By the way, ace is a verb that means (according to CDO) "to do very well in an exam," so that's another verb you could use.

  • You brought something up that is very important to me. I mean "When speaking, you could leave off the word "I" in front; it's considered implied and therefore you don't always need to say it:" I wish, you had explained it more to me, because I see it a lot but I don;t know where to use – PMX128 May 17 '15 at 18:39
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    @English John Lawler has written about this before: english.stackexchange.com/questions/66972/… – snailcar May 17 '15 at 18:40
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    (I) Wish there was an easy way to explain that one, but, if there is, I can't think of it. It should be something you hear more often than you see in print, though, because it's more of a conversational thing. – J.R. May 17 '15 at 18:42
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I actually wouldn't say any of those. I'd probably say:

Good luck!

or

Good luck with the exam!

If I wanted to use a hope or wish verb, I'd phrase it this way:

I hope you do well on the exam!

I'd avoid saying things like "I hope you pass" in part because it sounds like I'm not very confident in my friend. It sounds like I think they might fail it! And no one wants to think about failing before they take an exam.

In general, you don't "pass well". You either pass or fail. That's why I chose to say "do well" instead.

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