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Have we crossed the bridge?
Are we cross the bridge?

Is this your pen?
Has this your pen?

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    It has to be "Are we across the bridge?" or "Have we crossed the bridge?" Different words, different usage rules, but generally the same meaning.
    – user264
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 15:39
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    Languages like French and German use both have and are with past participles, so you can have J'ai vu and Je suis arrivé (and similarly in German). But in English, the perfect tense (past) is always introduced with have. So "Have we crossed?"
    – Nick Dixon
    Commented Apr 23, 2013 at 15:52

1 Answer 1

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It is "Have we crossed the bridge?" and "Is this your pen?" In the first case, the sentence is using the present perfect of cross, while the second sentence is using the simple present of be.

To understand which is the correct it, change the question in a statement.
In the first case, it would be "We have crossed the bridge." since "has/have crossed" is the present perfect tense of cross, not "We are cross the bridge." You could say "We are crossing the bridge." and the relative question would be "Are we crossing the bridge?" If you say "We are cross." cross is an adjective that means "annoyed or quite angry." In that case, you cannot say "We are cross the bridge." You could say "We are across the bridge." which would mean "We are on the other side of the bridge." In that case, the relative question would be "Are we across the bridge?"
In the second case the statement would be "This is your pen." not "This has your pen." You could say "This person has your pen." and the relative question would be "Does this person have your pen?"

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