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I came across the following dialogue in an American TV show, called Younger.

I am not sure what Could we ever bridge this bitter rivalry? means. I guess can we unite this bitter competition but my Chinese subtitle meant let's have a fight. Am I misunderstanding this?

Also, I got a hit means hi or someone looks for Diana on match.com?

Context: Diana is a director of a publishing house. Liza is an assistant of Diana.

Diana: I got a hit. Look. [Diana is looking on match.com]

Liza: [gasps] Ooh, he's handsome.

Diana: And he's a tenured professor at Columbia Medical School. He likes rock climbing; his Australian shepherd, Ben; and Sundays at The Frick.

Liza: You love The Frick.

Diana: I love The Frick. He writes, "I see from your profile that you are a member of the East Side Chamber Music Society. I am a member of the West Side Chamber Music Society. Could we ever bridge this bitter rivalry?"

Liza: Adorable.

Diana: Stop cheerleading and help me. What should I write back?

Liza: How about, "Some rivalries are fated."

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    There's an established rivalry (enmity, hostility, bad feeling) between the two music societies. Metaphorically, Diana and the professor are separated from each other by that ill-will - bridging the rivalry means finding a way for them to "reach across the divide" and get on together amicably, overcoming their natural tendency to support their own side and attack members of the other side. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica May 20 '15 at 14:24
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A hit in this case is most similar to the 23rd definition of “bite” here. It’s a positive connection as the result of a search. You have the right idea.

“Could we ever bridge this bitter rivalry?” is a joke. The man is presenting something they have in common (membership in a chamber music societies) as a potentially irreconcilable difference, like membership in rival gangs or families (like the lovers in West Side Story and Romeo and Juliet).

Rivalry is no mere competition. It’s a relationship (usually between groups) that is defined by conflict. Chamber music societies are made up of sophisticated people who are completely removed from any sort of violence, so it is all the more humorous to picture them locked in a bitter rivalry.

...bridging the rivalry means finding a way for them to "reach across the divide" and get on together amicably, overcoming their natural tendency to support their own side and attack members of the other side. – FumbleFingers, above

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