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I'm looking for my notebook. I remember ..... it into my suitcase when I left for work.

Q: Do I always have to fill 'gerund' in the blank?

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Each English verb licenses (permits) a particular set of complement types. Remember is slightly unusual in having a different meaning with different complement types.

  • With gerund clauses and fused relative clauses, remember has the sense “recall, experience a memory of” a previous event:

    I remember putting my noteboook into my briefcase when I left for work.
    I remember where I put my notebook when I left for work—in my briefcase.

  • With infinitive clauses, however, it means “recall (and subsequently perform)” a future obligation:

    I remembered to put my noteboook into my briefcase when I left for work.
    Remember to put your noteboook into your briefcase when you leave for work.

  • With ‘content’ clauses it may have either meaning; the relationship between the tenses in the main clause and the subordinate clause tell you which is intended.

    I remember [that] I put my notebook into my briefcase when I left for work.
    I remembered [that] I must put my notebook into my briefcase when I left for work.

    As this question tells us, you may encounter infinitive phrases being employed in this double sense as recently as the late nineteenth century; but this is no longer the case in Present-day English.

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