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Is there an English verb meaning "To become aware after surgery, to wake up from anesthesia (sedation)"?

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The phrasal verb come to, meaning to regain consciousness, is what immediately springs to mind. A doctor might say to a patient, "You will come to about fifteen minutes after the surgery is complete."

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    Note that "come to" is used not just in the situation that you are asking about, but in any situation involving the loss and regaining of consciousness, such as being knocked on the head. It is not used when waking up from sleep. – BobRodes May 25 '15 at 21:12
  • You could also say "come around"/"come round", which I think I'd be more likely to opt for, personally. But that's surely just a matter of geography and regional variation - or perhaps of taste. – Au101 May 26 '15 at 2:33
  • I believe "come to" can also be used to describe recovery from (perceived) lapses of judgement or sanity: "some may think I'm wrong, but they'll come to eventually.". In other words "coming to your senses" can be from a broader category of lapses of sense than actual loss of consciousness. – PeterT May 26 '15 at 10:04
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I've been an OR nurse for 15 years. We generally say the patient is "waking up," as if from a nap. There is a verb for putting someone under anesthesia, we call that "induction" but there is no specific word for waking up.

  • Could you add your region and training? Based on the answer given by @SteveSchwalbe, it sounds like this may not be universal. – Adam Aug 27 '15 at 16:09
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The term we use in anesthesia is "emerge" or "emergence".

A general anesthetic is usually divided into three phases: induction, maintenance and emergence.

As a means of demonstrating how we use the term, here are a few examples. "The patient had a smooth emergence." or "His blood pressure didn't become a problem until the emergence." or "He became unstable as he started to emerge from the anesthesia." or "I will give him the reversal just before he begins to emerge."

  • Hi Steve. Would you give an example of how it's used in a sentence? It seems like a pretty specialized usage, and a typical dictionary might not be very helpful to a learner for this sense of emerge. – ColleenV parted ways Jul 8 '15 at 16:46
  • Sure. "The patient had a smooth emergence." or "His blood pressure didn't become a problem until the emergence." or "He became unstable as he started to emerge from the anesthesia." or "I will give him the reversal just before he begins to emerge." – Steve Schwalbe Jul 8 '15 at 17:48
  • General anesthesia is usually divided into 1) Induction, 2) Maintenance and 3) Emergence. – Steve Schwalbe Jul 8 '15 at 17:49
  • Thanks! Would you edit that into your answer pleae? Comments on SE sites are temporary, and they can't easily be searched. When a comment is deleted, it can't be undeleted and it doesn't have a revision history like questions and answers. – ColleenV parted ways Jul 8 '15 at 17:54
  • SteveSchwalbe - Great answer! Could you add your region and training? Based on the answer given by @corwarner, it sounds like this may not be universally used. – Adam Aug 27 '15 at 16:09
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"come out from under (the effects of the anesthesia)"

These five examples (out of many) are spread over 100 years.

Example 1

Example 2

Example 3

Example 4

Example 5

Etc

  • I don't know why this was downvoted. Was it because the sources the user has cited are not very credible in terms of linguistics and grammar? – Mamta D Oct 8 '15 at 6:02

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