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I have searched a bunch of grammar websites, and they all say continous tense can be used with "when" or "while", but they did not mention if it can be used with "after" or "before". Could somebody help me with this??

I have found some examples on the net but I am not sure about their correctness.

I was doing homework before I played video games.

I was doing just fine before you came.

I was planning to do so after you came back from your trip to the ancient temple.

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    The verbs in your examples are used correctly. I edited to correct a few minor mistakes in the grammar and usage elsewhere. There are a number of words that work with continuous tense. "As" is another very common one. I was texting on my phone as I walked down the street and so I stumbled into a tree. – Jason Patterson May 27 '15 at 14:23
  • I was doing homework before I played video games.In this example you better say I had been doing my homework before I played video games.The same structure for two other examples. – user18905 May 27 '15 at 14:37
  • @user18905 Why is that better? – Catija May 27 '15 at 16:19
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In the sentences you posted, it is better to use a past perfect continuous.

I was doing homework before I played video games.

I was doing just fine before you came.

I was planning to do so after you came back from your trip to the ancient temple.

The past simple continuous is used when you want to focus on a point in time instead of the duration.

What were you doing yesterday at 5pm?

vs

What have you been doing the past few weeks?

And to answer your question about after and before: Yes, I think you can perfectly use the continuous tense in combination with those.

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