1

I came across a TV show dialogue.

I couldn't find lots taken in any dictionaries. I guess it means I care and I was insulted but my Chinese subtitle means I don't care, it's okay.

None taken is generally used to reply to No offense. I believe None taken is an antonyms of Lots taken. Could you please correct me? Thanks.

**NO OFFENCE** - A phrase added to an otherwise insulting statement. 

You say "no offense" right before or after you say 
something that is insulting. 

"No offense" allows you to say just about anything you want about anyone.

It is sometimes followed up by "none taken." 

The recipient of the original comment says "none taken" 
to signal that they were not insulted.

Context: Kelsey and Liza are friends. Thad is Kelsey's boyfriend. Josh is Liza's boyfriend

Kelsey: We're gonna see that guy that Liza's been seeing, Josh. We're gonna go see Josh at his tattoo parlor in Brooklyn, and we're all gonna get tattoos.

Thad: Babe, you know I don't do Brooklyn. No offense.

Liza: Lots taken.

3

Yes, you're right. "Lots taken" means that they were offended by the statement.

In your first example, you have:

A: No offense.
B: None taken.

The "none taken" means "no offense was taken".

Similarly, in:

A: No offense.
B: Lots taken.

Here, "lots taken" means "a lot of offense was taken"... so the rude comment was made and, despite A trying to play it off, B still took offense at the comment.

Though, in reality, this is likely said sarcastically, or as a joke. It would be unlikely for someone to use this if they were actually offended.

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  • @BrianHitchcock You're totally right. I'd mentally told myself to add that in and failed. – Catija May 28 '15 at 8:46
  • Can I ask 1 more question? What does you know I don't do Brooklyn mean? I guess I don't like Brooklyn . There is no result from google. – puputeh24 May 30 '15 at 1:24
  • 1
    You should ask it as a new question. :) – Catija May 30 '15 at 1:40

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