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Source: p 258, A Student's Introduction to English Grammar (2005), by Huddleston & Pullum

[1.] The main elements that trigger inversion like this include:
... expressions containing so or only, as in [46]
- or Sue is going, and so am I. ...

I ask this question only for 'so' in a correlative conjunction (eg 'Just as ..., so ...'), for which I usually witness subject-auxiliary inversion. Thus, for the main clause, why were so and is NOT inverted?
I would've written:

[3.] ... so is protensio derived ...

Source: p 54, The Logic of Apuleius ..., edited by David George Londey, Carmen J. Johanson

[2.] For just as the word protasis is derived from a Greek verb of holding out or offering, viz., proteino, so protensio is derived from the matching Latin verb protendo.

Footnote: I encountered this quote while researching the etymology of 'protasis'.

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    Sometimes it does--As Maine goes, so goes the nation--sometimes it doesn't. The inverted construction is old-fashioned; it is giving way to an uninverted construction which makes the parallelism clearer. – StoneyB on hiatus May 28 '15 at 18:35
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    I guess I'm not 100% what is even being asked here, but would this be more appropriate on English SE? What about this makes it an ELL question? – DCShannon Jul 10 '15 at 21:31
  • @StoneyB: I think that's a slightly different use of so from the one in the question. The example in the question has the form "Just as [complete statement], so [complete statement]", whereas your example has the form "As [statement with an empty slot for an adverbial complement], so [statement with empty slot for an adverbial complement]." Both of these uses of so can be used with or without inversion, but I think that the use in your example is more often found with inversion than the use in the OP's example. – ruakh Jul 13 '15 at 2:14
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Actually, it isn't a very happily constructed sentence altogether.

For just as the word protasis is derived from a Greek verb of holding out or offering, viz., proteino, so protensio is derived from the matching Latin verb protendo.

It's wobbly in more ways than two. "... derevied from a Greek verb of holding out or offering" is a bit awkward, and the uninverted construction is downright lame, making the sentence choppy and needlessly difficult to read through.

The inverted construction is not old-fashioned; it's very much in use today. The uninverted construction is not taking over: it's merely allowed for the sake of those who are so forgiving as to suffer gladly sentences whose most striking feature is phraseological vulgarity.

Consider this:

For just as the word protasis is derived from a Greek verb that literally means "to extend forward," viz., proteino, so is protensio derived from the matching Latin verb protendo.

And, voila - suddenly it's smooth and free-flowing, a soaring bird of a sentence. This isn't rocket science.

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