1

I did some research on how common stomach related problems are described in English, and made some sentences. Would you please look at them and let me know are they all correct and sound natural to you?

  1. My stomach is growling.
  2. Why does my stomach growl even when I'm not hungry?
  3. What can I do to prevent my stomach from growling?
  4. What makes my stomach growl?
  5. My stomach is killing me and I feel like I’m going to puke!
  6. What is causing my stomach burning?
  7. My stomach is bloated.
  8. My stomach is upset.

I really did hard work and tried my best to make all possible sentences related to this issue.

Is there any other word which is commonly used to describe stomach related problems? Can you provide an example sentence for each word?

1

All of them sound natural to me except #6. I would say instead:

Why is my stomach burning?

or

What is making my stomach burn?

One other note, though; even though Nos. 1-4 are worded okay, I would not call those "stomach problems." The phrase stomach problems is usually used to describe ailments like indigestion, as you did in Nos. 5 - 8. A growling tummy isn't really a stomach "problem," not in the way I usually hear stomach problems.


Is there any other word which is commonly used to describe stomach related problems?

There probably are, although I think you nailed the two most common ones with Nos. 7 & 8. Upset is often used when referring to the stomach organ, while bloated is sometimes used when referring to the lower abdomen in general, and may not be related to digestive problems at all. Sometimes you might hear the term GI used, particularly in the medical community (GI being short for gastrointenstinal). You can simply Google GI problems for a boatload of examples.

  • @j-r I offer my gratitude to you for answering my question because after going through your response I don't feel like waiting for another answer. Well, I think you really understand how to quench the thirst of English learner and I desperately wish I'd be near you or able to talk to you because I'm sure I'll become expert in your presence just by listening to you, even without asking any question. – Sam Apr 26 '13 at 9:56
  • @j-r When should we particularly use this:- "My stomach is upset." because someone spoke this sentence (he never wanted to have meal so in excuse he said that sentence) and the person might had slight gastric problem or not feeling like having meal as far as I know so I think he used the sentence at a wrong time. We should say this sentence only when we feel pain in stomach or suffering loose motion etc... or in any other stomach related problems. Am I correct? – Sam Apr 26 '13 at 9:57
  • An upset stomach implies some sort of digestive problem. I'd usually assume it is referring to ailments with symptoms of nausea or cramps, and perhaps diarrhea as well. You use that term when you want to be very careful about what you eat, if you bother to eat anything at all. One other informal term you might hear is stomach bug. – J.R. Apr 26 '13 at 11:26
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Regarding number five

My stomach is killing me and I feel like I’m going to puke!

It would be more natural as My stomach is killing me and I feel like I’m going to to be sick!. See http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/sick_2 and the first example at this link http://www.macmillandictionary.com/dictionary/british/sick

Another way that would be more natural would be My stomach is killing me and I feel like I’m going to vomit! see http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/british/vomit?q=vomit

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