-1

Not every job will end up with a success.

What is the meaning of "with" here? Why not use other preposition?

Could native speakers please describe the scene of this sentence for me? Thx.

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    In this exact context, idiomatically we're more likely to use in and discard the superfluous preposition/phrasal verb particle up and the indefinite article, giving Not every job will end in success. But there's nothing wrong with with, and in closely-related constructions such as Every speech ended with a standing ovation it's actually more common. If you want a semantic justification (not always particularly helpful for established idiomatic usages like this) you could say with = together, at the same time/place (the end and the success coincide). – FumbleFingers May 31 '15 at 14:13
1

In this exact context, idiomatically we're more likely to use in and discard the superfluous preposition/phrasal verb particle up, and the indefinite article, giving Not every job will end in success. But there's nothing wrong with with, and in closely-related constructions such as Every speech ended with a standing ovation it's actually more common.

If you want a semantic justification (not always particularly helpful for established idiomatic usages like this) you could say with = (happening) together; at the same time/place; end result+success coincide.


I already posted the above as a comment, but I thought it was worth showing these two usages...

1: Selfist humanism starts with optimism but ends in pessimism.
2: verse 2 starts in an accusatory manner, with the conjunction P'1,38 but ends with a vindication

..which I think illustrate just how "finely-balanced" the choice of preposition can be with starting and ending [up]. You might think there's something slightly odd about using both (in either sequence) within a binary juxtaposition (A but B).

But they're are both perfectly well-formed, and in my opinion actually represent the best choices for the exact contexts as phrased.


EDIT: Despite what I originally said about "semantic justification" not always being helpful, I think @Catija's link on another of these interrelated questions is worth noting. It actually lists no less than 23 different ways you could understand constructions involving with. But even probably the most "unintuitive" one...

20 used to show who or what a strong wish or order concerns
Down with school!
Off to bed with you!

...can be "understood" as meaning let these two things (being down/going off to bed and school/you) be together, coexist - they're just metaphoric extensions from Do you want fries with your burger?

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