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Is there a single word that means "the text of a question/problem/exercise"?

The actual sentence where I'd like to use it is:

The XXX of the problem is too long to fit in a single page.

  • In fact, I believe the best word for this particular purpose would be: "The CONTENT of the exercise/question is too long...". The thing is, in English if you wanted to say that the exercise was too long, we normally refer to it as simply "the exercise". So saying, "the exercise was too long", would be correct as well! – James Wirth Jun 1 '15 at 8:27
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    @parkgatedev - Or "the problem": The problem is too long to fit on one page. – J.R. Jun 1 '15 at 9:39
  • Can I suggest the simple, straightforward body? "The body of the question was too long to fit on a single page." – Dan Bron Jun 1 '15 at 11:07
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You just said it! Anything 'written' using alphabet can be called as 'text'. In other words, any form of written material is text.

So, you can say...

the text of the question (or whatever) is too long to fit in ....

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  • The word 'text' in this context is not particularly what you would say in English. – James Wirth Jun 1 '15 at 8:28
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You could simply say:

The question/exercise/problem is too long to fit on one page.

The text of... is fine too, but the way I formulated it above is much more concise and I am sure people will perfectly understand what is meant.

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    I agree, that's the best way. If the OP really wanted to stick with the original form for some reason, then this could be used: The length of the problem is too long to fit on one page. – J.R. Jun 1 '15 at 9:29
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You asked if there was "single word" that means "the text of a question/problem/exercise". Depending on the type of question, there may be.

If it's a multiple choice question, the question part is called the stem. From Wikipedia:

The stem is the beginning part of the item that presents the item as a problem to be solved, a question asked of the respondent, or an incomplete statement to be completed, as well as any other relevant information.

It's very unlikely that a multiple choice question would be too long for one page, but we could say something like:

The stem of the question is too long to fit on one line.

Some reading comprehension questions contain some text to be read before the questions are answered. In that case, the text might be too long to fit on one page. That part of the question is usually referred to as the passage. As one website says:

Main idea questions ask you to identify the "primary purpose" or "main point" of the passage .. Supporting idea questions are often prefaced by "according to the passage" or "the passage states that".

So, if that's the kind of question we are dealing with, we could say:

The passage for these questions is too long to fit on one page.

Outside these special cases, though, for a typical word problem, I would simply say:

The word problem is too long to fit on one page.

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