0

I could organize it that someone could win a round-trip air ticket.

Paul put it that he was going to have to make a choice.


In my case, as a second language learner, I put the pause between it and that. How about for the native speakers??

3
  • What does condent mean in your first example sentence? Maybe a typo for confident?
    – Dan Bron
    Jun 4 '15 at 10:42
  • yope, I've changed the example.
    – Rok Sim
    Jun 4 '15 at 10:44
  • 1
    No pauses in these sentences. A pause between it and that makes it sound unnatural.
    – user6951
    Jun 4 '15 at 11:55
1

I would put a syntactic pause where the OP has indicated, after the main independent clause, to demarcate where the subordinate clause begins. This is not a "rhetorical" pause.

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Sentence 1

Sentence 2

No discernible pause necessary. (British English). My voice.

1
  • You're speaking naturally yet fairly quickly. Though you may think the pause is not discernible, it is. It's a relative duration: the very brief "parsing-rhythm" pause between each of the words Paul..put..it and that..he..was is considerably shorter than the syntactic pause between "it" and "that", and the syntactic boundary is further corroborated by the intonational contours. Jun 4 '15 at 15:06
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Smooth out your sentences.

I could organize the contest so that someone could win a round-trip air ticket. Paul put the statement to me that he'll have to make a choice.

0

In your sentence examples the "it" creates a natural pause, especially in the first sentence, consider

I could organize it that someone could win a round-trip air ticket.

versus

I could organize that someone could win a round-trip air ticket.

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