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I could not figure our whole sentence because of the word having in the following sentence.What is its function?

In choosing to bundle up four separate June repayments, Greece avoids triggering an immediate default. But in the event of a delayed repayment, according to IMF protocol, Greece would be afforded a 30-day grace period, during which it would be urged to pay back the money as soon as possible, and before Ms Lagarde notifies her executive board of the late payment. Following this hiatus, a technical default could be declared a month later, when "a complaint regarding the member’s overdue obligations is issued by the Managing Director to the Executive Board". In the interim, Greece may well stump up the cash having spooked creditors and the markets of the possibility of a fatal breach of the sanctity of monetary union.

In the interim, Greece may well stump up the cash having spooked creditors and the markets of the possibility of a fatal breach of the sanctity of monetary union.

Source

  • 'spooked' means 'scared' or 'frightened' in this case. A simpler version could read: "For now, Greece has to find its own cach because it has scared away creditors (and other means of borrowing money) and also because they made the monetary union mad by breaking some rules. – Michael Dorgan Jun 12 '15 at 0:19
  • @MichaelDorgan Thanks. but as you said " they made IMF mad..." , shouldnt it have written like " Greece may well stump up the cash having creditors spooked...". This could change the rest of the sentence also. – Mrt Jun 12 '15 at 0:24
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    For having here, see this answer to the question passing vs having passed. – user6951 Jun 12 '15 at 0:45
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    having spooked is a participial perfect. "In the interim Greece may well pay, after it has frightened creditors &c" – StoneyB on hiatus Jun 12 '15 at 1:49
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    The sentence could also mean 'Greece will produce creditors who are spooked and have cash'. But that wouldn't make much sense, especially because they're creditors, and so have given their cash to Greece. :P – Damien H Jun 12 '15 at 2:53

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