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Consider these two expressions:

It has been a dominant election for X political party. For 9 out of every 10 constituency, it is a X party representative who won the election.

It has been a dominant election for X political party. For 9 out of every 10 constituency, there is a X party representative who won the election.

Do these two expressions with the "it is"/"there is" construct have the same meaning? I feel like of the two, only the first one is correct; the second one feels a bit awkward to me and I don't know what it means.

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    I am having some doubts on the previous sentence, "for 9 out of 10 constituency". I would use "electoral district", but in any case it should be plural. And I would say "in 90% of all constituencies" rather than the somewhat awkward "9 out of every 10". – laureapresa Jun 16 '15 at 8:46
  • Should be "an X party representative". – user3169 Jun 16 '15 at 20:43
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You do not want to use existential constructions there. Simplify.

It has been a dominant election for X political party.

You have a real subject at hand, so why use a dummy subject?

X political party has dominated the election.

For 9 out of every 10 constituency, it is a X party representative who won the election

Again, the same thing: you have a real subject at hand:

An X party representative has won 9 of every 10 electoral races.

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Both sound pretty awkward, I would write it as:

It has been a dominant election for political party X. For 9 out of every 10 constituencies, a party X representative won the election.

You wouldn't say

this is the dog who barked,

or

this dog barked.

Both sentences are grammatically correct, but the second is less complicated and flows better.

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