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Yet always makes me not understand any context. It seems that it has millions of meanings. I have this sentence in a TOEFL reading passage.

Finally, even if the scroll didn't point to real treasure, it has yet to be found. This is because the sixty-four locations the scroll describes are referred to vaguely or have ancient place names whose meanings and locations are no longer known.

What does yet mean in that sentence?

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    The sentence is illogical. The second clause is a non sequitur. To make it logical, the first clause would have to be Finally, even if the scroll {did / claimed to [CHOOSE ONE]} point to real treasure,. The writer had a serious mental block when creating this sentence. It wasn't proofread. – user264 May 1 '13 at 15:53
  • @Bill Franke: If we assume the referent of it is real treasure, the first sentence is indeed illogical in and of itself. But if we assume the referent is the scroll, it's a credible utterance (although doesn't point seems a more likely choice of tense, and the next sentence then becomes a non sequitur anyway). – FumbleFingers May 1 '13 at 17:36
  • @Fumble: The 2nd S tells us that the scroll describes 64 locations that "are referred to vaguely or have ancient place names whose meanings and locations are no longer known", so "it" has to refer to the treasure & not the scroll. – user264 May 1 '13 at 23:29
  • @Bill Franke: Like I said, in and of itself, the 1st S can be seen as credible/logical. It's only when you try to incorporate the 2nd S that things unavoidably come unstuck. – FumbleFingers May 2 '13 at 2:34
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It just means that the treasure has not been found.

  • -1 What does "it" mean in your answer? You've used it twice, but the second "it" has no referent and badly needs one. The sentence in the OP's question is both ambiguous and illogical. Your answer is unclear. – user264 May 1 '13 at 15:49
  • Bill, I meant that treasure has not been found yet. That's the meaning that I got from the quote. Why the downvote? – Tristan May 1 '13 at 15:56
  • Now that I've reread the question, I can see that it's not quite as ambiguous as I thought. I can change the downvote if the answer is edited. I don't know whether that means you have to edit it or someone else can edit it. All that needs to be done is for the second "it" to be changed to "the treasure" and the word "yet" to be deleted. That makes the answer complete. I apologize for being too hasty. – user264 May 1 '13 at 16:24
  • I can see what you mean, Bill. I did not explain myself clearly. That happens sometimes. Your edit was logical and therefore good. – Tristan May 1 '13 at 21:17
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The nearest equivalent of yet (in this context) is still. "It has yet to be found," means it is still to be found."

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" it has yet to be found. " Means "from the time people started looking, until this moment, it has not been found. It is possible that it will be found in the future."

Used in this sense, "yet" is indicating that a state or action began in the past, has continued to the present, and has not stopped.

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It means that

There are problems regarding finding the treasure, Still It needs to be found.

The use of still here is along the lines of in spite of, Despite of.

Another use of yet in similar context

He has been brillant for X team his whole carrer, Yet he needs to win this game for them else his legacy will be ruined.

  • -1 The sentence in the OP's question is both ambiguous and illogical. Your answer doesn't explain what it means. – user264 May 1 '13 at 15:54

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