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I'd like to ask whether the direct object in this sentence is a non-finite clause and thus the sentence is not a simple sentence?

Gatsby doesn't want to have any trouble with anybody.

I'd analyze it like this:

  • Gatsby (subject)
  • doesn't want (predicator)
  • to have any trouble with anybody (direct object)

Is that to have any trouble with anybody a non-finite clause or just a verb phrase?

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  • I count three verbs "doesn't", "want" and "have"
    – James K
    Mar 30, 2022 at 17:40

1 Answer 1

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to have any trouble with anybody is both a verb phrase and a non-finite clause.

Within the main clause, the whole phrase is a verb phrase with the function of direct object, just as you analysed it.

On its own level (non-finite clause) you could analyze it like so:

  • to have: predicate
  • any trouble: object
  • with anybody: prepositional object
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  • Sorry, that was a typo :P I edited my post
    – Vlammuh
    Jun 21, 2015 at 14:33

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