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How much permissible to say, "I liked the breakfast the hotel we stayed served", omitting a preposition such as "in" after stayed?

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  • One has to read your incorrect sentence three times to find out that you omitted " where/ in which". Have you found something that says you can omit those words?
    – rogermue
    Jun 27, 2015 at 4:39
  • No, but I felt some do speak without a preposition in a casual conversation similar to, "How long did you run?" omitting "for". Doesn't your unnoticing of the omission soon prove that? Jun 29, 2015 at 3:59

3 Answers 3

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If your goal is to communicate, that sentence does not do a good job.

The preposition is needed to make the sentence coherent. Without the preposition, the sentence is also ungrammatical.

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You stay at/in a hotel; you don't stay a hotel. You sentence is grammatically incorrect if you omit the preposition "at/in" in your sentence.

.I liked the breakfast served at the hotel we stayed at/in.

.I liked the breakfast served at the hotel where we stayed.

.I liked the breakfast served at the hotel in which we stayed.

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"I liked the breakfast the hotel we stayed served" -- can you omit the preposition (e.g. 'in' or 'at') after stayed?

No, you cannot omit the preposition. We don't 'stay a hotel'. We 'stay in' or 'stay at' a hotel.

To 'stay {something}' means to stop it. The governor can 'stay an execution'.

But we can point at, or mention, a hotel and say "I have stayed there".

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