1

Are these responses grammatical?

  1. Speaker A: What did John force Mary to do?
    Speaker B: Her into buying the house.

  2. Speaker A: What did John talk to Jim?
    Speaker B: Him into believing the news.

The original sentences of speaker B are as follows:

  1. John forced Mary into buying the house.
  2. John talked Jim into believing the news.

And, if I give some context for them, is it possible to understand? such as:

(Context: John wants Mary to buy the house, and then he has insanely talked to her for his goal.)

Speaker A: What did John force Mary to do?
Speaker B: Her into buying the house.

1 Answer 1

4

They're not quite right. A better construction would be like this:

  1. Speaker A: What did John force Mary to do?
    Speaker B: Buy the house.

  2. Speaker A: What did John talk Jim into?
    Speaker B: Believing the news.

OR, more formally, Speaker B might make a complete sentence in each case:

  1. Speaker A: What did John force Mary to do?
    Speaker B: John forced Mary to buy the house.

  2. Speaker A: What did John talk Jim into?
    Speaker B: John talked Jim into believing the news.

(Speaker B may also choose to say 'He' instead of 'John' in both statements, and/or use 'Her' and 'Him' for Mary and Jim.)

Note that talking Jim into something is NOT the same as merely talking to Jim about something. Talking into is an idiom for convincing.

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