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How come is the meaning common in everyday speech? I mean, we may use just remove instead. For instance:

The stains from the meat sauce won't come out.

What is the difference between these two sentences?

The stains from the meat sauce won't be removed .

or

The stains from the meat sauce won't be come out.

  • 3
    Idiomatic are "won't come out", or if it's paint or gunk on the surface, "won't come off". An idiomatic version of "won't be removed" is "refuses to come out" (or "can't be removed"). This grape juice stain refuses to come out. The stain is faintly personified. It is said to be a "stubborn" stain. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 28 '15 at 11:53
  • agreed. And "can't be removed" is more likely phrasing than "won't be removed", at least in AmE. "...won't" can be understood as future rather than personified volition. – Brian Hitchcock Jun 29 '15 at 8:16
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  1. The stains from the meat sauce won't come out.

  2. The stains from the meat sauce won't be removed.

  3. The stains from the meat sauce won't be come out.

The sentences #1 and #2 are grammatically correct. You use come out in the same way as wash out. The stains won't wash out.The phrasal verb come out is an intransitive verb. On the other hand, the word remove is a transitive verb. That't why you have used "be" after won't with the past participle removed to make the sentence in the passive voice.

The sentence #3 is grammatically incorrect. Come out is an intransitive verb. You cannot use it as a transitive verb or form a sentence in the passive voice.

  • The stamement that intransitive verbs cannot be used in passive voice is wrong. So, I don't understand why you mentioned it.... – Dmitrii Bundin Jun 28 '15 at 13:22
  • @DmitryBundin An intransitive verb generally cannot be passivized in English. You can make your third sentence grammatical by removing be: "The stains from the meat sauce won't come out." – snailboat Jun 28 '15 at 14:12
  • @DmitryBundin It is quite true that intransitive verbs cannot be used in the passive voice: only an object of the verb can act as the subject of a passive. An apparent exception, the use of the object of a post-verb preposition as subject (This bed has been slept in), involves recategorizing the verb/preposition collocation and is only possible when the action of the verb has a discernible effect on the object. – StoneyB Jun 28 '15 at 14:17
  • @Khan "The stain won't wash out" is in fact a different phenomenon: wash is employed there in what is sometimes called "middle voice", in which the Patient of the verb acts as its Agent. – StoneyB Jun 28 '15 at 14:22
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One of the meaning come out is be removed.

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Personally, I would use come off and not come out.

come out does mean that something is being removed, but from INSIDE something else. A similar meaning to extract (not a synonym):

This screw will not come out

I am trying to extract the screw from its hole, but I cannot (because it is too tight maybe?).

come off means something is ON something else and I want to remove it.

The stains from the meat sauce won't come off.

I am trying to remove the stains, but I cannot (because they are too thick?).

Now with this modification, on to your sentences:

a. The stains from the meat sauce won't come off.

b. The stains from the meat sauce won't be removed.

b to me sounds like the act of removing the stains will not happen. That is, nobody will do it or even try it. a means that no matter how hard you're trying, you cannot manage to remove the stains.

  • 2
    But most people would say come out when talking about stains. – snailboat Jun 28 '15 at 11:25
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    Out, damned spot! – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 28 '15 at 11:49

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