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There's a seminar being held. And one of the sessions is about the introduction of New Product, starting at 10 am. And I'd like to know which one is the best choice among followings and if these are right grammatically.

  1. There will a session to introduce the new product at 10 am.

  2. A session to introduce the new product is scheduled to take place at 10 am.

And I'd like to know if the infinitive 'to introduce', modifying session, is suggesting that the introduction of the new product is sheduled in the session.

  • To introduce” describes the purpose of the session. It says nothing about its scheduling. – Jim Jun 30 '15 at 3:05
  • I used "scheduled" a few questions back loosely, in the sense "something planned for the future". The tense of "will be" implies the planning; the infinitive-phrase refers to the purpose of the planned event. "Why did you open the window? To give us some fresh air." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 30 '15 at 10:10
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"to introduce the new product" is just a subphrase, it can be left out without affecting grammatical meeting. Since both:

  1. There will be a session at 10 am.
  2. A session is scheduled to take place at 10 am.

are fine, the subphrase just describes the session, and both are grammatical and equivalent.

Make sure your 1. includes a main verb, "will" doesn't mean anything by itself.

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Your first example:

There will a session to introduce the new product at 10 am.

Is incorrect as it stands. Will, when used like this is an auxiliary verb and will always need a main verb to follow it.

You could use:

There will be a session to introduce the new product at 10 am.

You could make introduce the main verb but it sounds clumsy (to my ear at least)

A session will introduce the new product at 10am

Your second example:

A session to introduce the new product is scheduled to take place at 10 am.

Is correct and the meaning is clear as long as the context is established.

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