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A few days ago, I learned about 'enough that~' sentence structure like:

  1. I don't go joging often enough that I would buy a pair of dedicated walking shoes.

And I'd like to know if this sentence is the same meaning as

  1. I don't go joging as often as I would buy a pair of dedicated walking shoes.

Finally, I just want to double check making another sentence, so please let me know if this sentence is right to use.

  1. I am tired enough that I would need to take a nap right now.

  2. I am as tired as I would need to take a nap right now.

  • enough is often found with a to-infinitive complement. I don't go biking enough to spend thousands on a carbon-fiber frame. I don't go biking enough that I would spend thousands on a carbon-fiber frame. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 30 '15 at 10:02
  • You are tired enough that you would take a nap right now. You are tired enough that you would take a nap right now, if you could. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 30 '15 at 10:05
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Those sentences are not right.

I don't go jogging often enough that I would buy a pair of dedicated walking shoes.

This does not make sense. It should say: "I do not {do x} often enough that I would {do something related to x}". Going jogging and buying walking shoes are unrelated, so the comparison doesn't work. You could say walking and walking shoes, or jogging and jogging shoes:

I don't go walking often enough that I would buy a pair of dedicated walking shoes.

I don't go jogging often enough that I would buy a pair of dedicated jogging shoes.

Meaning: the person would get little benefit from buying the shoes.

And I'd like to know if this sentence is the same meaning as

I don't go jogging as often as I would buy a pair of dedicated walking shoes.

No they don't mean the same thing; as often as compares how often two things happen, and says which one happens more often. People don't buy walking shoes regularly, and would not talk about how often they would buy shoes compared to going running.

Finally, I just want to double check making another sentence, so please let me know if this sentence is right to use.

I am tired enough that I would need to take a nap right now.

Take "would" out of the sentence, and it works; meaning "I am very tired". Or:

I am tired enough that I would take a nap right now, if I was at home.

"I am tired enough to sleep, but I must not sleep here"

I am tired enough that I would need to take a nap right now, if we were going jogging this afternoon.

"I am tired enough that I would sleep if {...} (but I'm not going to sleep)"

I am as tired as I would need to take a nap right now.

This doesn't have any clear meaning. It's a mix of "as tired as {a comparison with some other level of tiredness}", "as tired as I would need to be {... to fulfil some condition ...}", "I would need to take a nap if { some condition }", "need to take a nap right now".

  • Good post but saying "I don't go jogging as often as I buy walking shoes." is valid for some people. For example I literaly don't go jogging as often as I buy walking shoes since I have bought 2 pairs of shoes in the last 4 years but have not been jogging once.:) – DRF Jun 30 '15 at 9:13
  • I've made 3 sentences and these are Okay? 1. I'm so tired that I need to take a nap right now. 2. I'm as tired as I would need to be to finish this project by 12 p.m., So it's okay. 3. I would need to take a nap if I pulled an all nighter for the tommorrow test. – jihoon Jun 30 '15 at 10:02
  • 1. and 3. are good. 2. has the right structure, but I don't understand it. Why must you be as tired as (..) before you can finish the project? What project needs tiredness? – TessellatingHeckler Jun 30 '15 at 11:28
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"I don't go jogging enough that I would buy a pair of dedicated shoes..." is a fit, doesn't repeat the word jogging or use walking as adjectives for the shoes. Dedicated is a great word to make the link between the activity and the kit to undertake it. TessellatingHeckler has given a thorough response on tiredness and naps enough that I commend you to it!

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