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Could you think of a sentence or situation where we could use the following interchangeably?

more and more

further

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  • And keep the meaning? The first examples that come to mind are ones where they can be swapped but where swapping them changes the meaning.
    – PerryW
    Jun 30, 2015 at 6:21
  • my guess is that further implies direction (a vector). Therefore you say go further. Meantime more speaks about volume, which has no direction. Occasionally, you do not bother.
    – Val
    Jun 30, 2015 at 14:22

2 Answers 2

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Yes, there are some cases. Let's take Caroffrey's examples and rearrange them a bit:

  • As the excavator kept digging more and more, he became more confident of finding something.

  • As the excavator kept digging further, he became more confident of finding something.

(Equivalent)

But, one might argue that the first sentence should say "farther", not "further", as it speaks of a physical distance.


Of course, in most cases they are not interchangeable; one sounds funny.

  • These days you hear about the internet more and more.

  • These days you hear about the internet further.

(Not Equivalent)


And in some cases the substitution is beyond peculiar:

  • To further your understanding, you should read this book.

  • To more and more your understanding, you should read this book.

(Not even close—not even grammatically possible!)

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How about this?

The more and more the excavator kept digging, the more confident he became of finding something.

The further the excavator kept digging, the more confident he became of finding something.

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  • 2
    Your use of more and more is not idiomatic (at least not in AmE). "The more the excavator kept digging..." would be correct. Jun 30, 2015 at 12:22
  • 1
    How do you know that you should use more in the second clause?
    – Val
    Jun 30, 2015 at 14:17
  • 1
    You appear to be mixing up two phrases: "more and more" which means "increasingly", the other "the more... the more" describing a positive connotation between two things.
    – Stephie
    Jun 30, 2015 at 14:39

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