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Here's a sentence I've made.

When I was a third grader in college, I participated in a contest.

A. Unlike most of the students who had been working on the project for more than a month,

B. Unlike most of the students, who had been working on the project for more than a month, (comma added)

.

  1. I had just a few days fot the contest.

  2. I had only a few days for the contest.

  3. I just had a few days for the contest.

  4. I only had a few days for the contest.

So I worked on the project extra hard in the days leading up to it.

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    The main clause in your sentence is clear enough that you don't need to worry whether lack of punctuation creates ambiguity. But a rule of thumb: never rely upon punctuation alone to disambiguate a statement. If a mere comma makes an important difference in the meaning of a sentence, rephrase the *$*%*@# sentence. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jun 30 '15 at 9:52
  • Adding the comma is exactly what is needed. There is no need to rephrase anything. – Brian Hitchcock Jun 30 '15 at 12:07
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    On a side note, 지훈씨, we don't refer to our years in college as "grades." We would say, "When I was a junior in college...," (assuming it is a four-year college) or, "(When I was) in my third year of college...". – pyobum Jul 7 '15 at 3:16
  • @pyobum 고마워요~!^^ – jihoon Jul 7 '15 at 3:37
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Okay, let's take A & B first.

In (B.), you are disassociating the students from who they actually were

who had been working on the project

when you are using a comma between the students and who had been working on the project

So (A.) is right.

A. Unlike most of the students who had been working on the project for more than a month,

Next, let's get on with 1,2,3 & 4. Here just and only when used before had will completely change the meaning of the sentence.

As in,

I just had a few days for the contest.

In the above, just plays the role of an Adverb of Time and it means just a while back.

I only had a few days for the contest.

The above says that you and only only yourself have a few days for something.

So using either 1 or 2 will get to mean what you actually want to.

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