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I would like to know how the UK equivalent/translation for a French student who is BAC+5 and going to get his engineering degree. Is it under/post/graduate?

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  • do you have any further questions on this topic? – amblina Jul 14 '15 at 15:52
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According to Wikipedia the BAC + 5 is seen as equivalent to a Masters in Science, also known as 'MSc.' in the UK. A Master's degree qualification is a postgraduate qualification.

A potentially useful article for you would be the Wikipedia page for National Qualifications Framework. The UK education system categorizes qualifications in 8 'levels'. The BAC + 5 is level 7. If you have a Masters in the UK is it assumed you completed previous study and attained at a bachelor's degree (or equivalent) so it is offered as a postgraduate degree. Masters programs are also known as 'graduate' degrees which is an import from US English.

Wiki Image of UK Degree qualifications

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  • Please note, that that the National Qualifications Framework (NQF) was replaced by the Qualifications and Credit Framework (QCF) in 2010. However, the article for NQF has a more helpful table in it which will be the same as QCF. The fourth link is to a diagram describing QCF. – amblina Jul 9 '15 at 12:26
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Whether or not a student is an undergraduate or postgraduate depends on whether they have already got a degree. Someone working towards their first degree is an undergraduate. Someone who already has a degree and is working towards a higher degree is a postgraduate.

I don't know if 'is BAC+5' means this person already has a degree or not but presumably you can work out the right word from the above.

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  • "...depends on whether they have already got a degree" ...from a college or university. (Non high-school) In the U.S. at least. – Adam Jul 1 '15 at 16:03
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For what it's worth: In America we normally talk about four "levels" of degree: associate, bachelor, master, and doctor. When you don't yet have a bachelors, you are said to be "undergraduate". An associates degree typically requires 2 years of study, and each higher level degree 2 more years over the previous.

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  • One tag onto this is that many (most?) people who get a bachelor's degree do so without getting an associate's degree first - they complete a single four year program for the bachelor's degree. This happens at the post-graduate level also, but getting a master's before the PhD (doctorate) is more common than getting an associate's degree before going for a bachelor's. – Adam Jul 1 '15 at 15:59
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    @Adam Yes, excellent point. Common tracks are AA and done; BS and done; BS -> MS and done; BS -> MS -> PhD. Some do AA -> BS, then maybe go further or maybe not, but I think that's relatively rare. – Jay Jul 1 '15 at 19:52

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