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I read few sentences in which I saw people use "That are" together, is it feasible to use like this or is there any possibility to use it?

I am bit of confused about it, can anybody please help me?

An example sentence, where I encountered this construction:

Here is a list of adjectives and their synonyms that are commonly used to describe people.

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    You are probably dealing with that used as a relative pronoun, like which or who. Can you give us an example? Jul 2 '15 at 12:03
  • @StoneyB here in the below example you can see it Here is a list of adjectives and their synonyms that are commonly used to describe people. Jul 2 '15 at 12:53
  • Structurally the example is ambiguous (does "words commonly used to describe people" apply to "adjectives and their synonyms", or just "their synonyms"?). Semantically it's pretty strange too - after all, surely the synonyms of "adjectives" must be adjectives themselves, so where is the sense in identifying them separately? Jul 2 '15 at 13:34
  • @FumbleFingers Semantically I think it probably uses "and their synonyms" to describe the fact that the adjectives are grouped. I.e. Words commonly used to describe people include : thin (skinny, lanky, slender,slim), fat (thickset, stout, bulky, obese)...
    – DRF
    Jul 2 '15 at 13:57
  • @DRF: I know that, but designating one of each (semantic?) group as the "adjective" (with the others as mere synonyms) just seems weird to me. Jul 2 '15 at 14:09
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In your example, that is employed as a relative pronoun, not a demonstrative pronoun. It is equivalent to which:

Here is a list of adjectives and their synonyms {that / which} are commonly used to describe people.

English relative pronouns do not inflect for number (singular or plural) as demonstrative pronouns do; they 'borrow' their number from their referents, the terms that they refer to. In this case, the referent of that is a little ambiguous—as FumbleFingers says, it may refer either to synonyms or to adjectives and their synonyms—but in any case the referent is plural, so that takes a plural verbform.

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